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The full moon eclipse going to occur on May 26, first one after Jan 2019

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The beauty of lunar eclipse 

May 15-16 is going to be spectacular for sky gazers. There will be a blood-red moon in the sky that is a total lunar eclipse. When the full moon slips into the Earth’s shadow then a lunar eclipse occurs. It will be shown to people in South America and the eastern side of North America. If you are among those who are continuously waiting for the eclipse living in North America’s west, or in Africa or Europe then you’ll also get to experience real beauty in the shape of not a total, but a partial lunar eclipse.

The full moon eclipse going to occur on May 26, the first one after Jan 2019 

This will be a wonder to see, as this is going to give a chance to witness the Japanese Lantern Effect. In such moments the surface of the moon looks like the color of glowing copper, turning up into a beautiful “uneclipsed yellow sliver.” This is according to Farmer’s Almanac. You can check the precise timings for the eclipse as per your location on the site TimeandDate.com.

It has everything covered. Since this is a lunar eclipse rather than a solar eclipse, you don’t need to worry about damaging your eyes by looking up. Even if you miss this one, no need to worry. There will be a repeat performance on November 7th-8th, 2022. You’ll be reminded in advance about that for sure.

The conjunction of Mars and Neptune 

After the upcoming eclipse on May 18th, you will enter into another mid-month treat. There will be the rare conjunction of Mars and Neptune. This will be visible in the pre-dawn moments. It is easy to spot Mars because it is tangerine-red. Neptune will be just 0°34′ north of it on the 18th. You will be easily able to see the planet with binoculars or a telescope. You’ll also get a closer look at that distant Big Blue Planet.

Four eclipses are going to occur this year, two of the moon and two of the sun. The first ones of these will occur during the early hours of Wednesday (May 26). The full moon will completely drown into Earth’s dark umbral shadow on this day. It produces the first total lunar eclipse since January 2019.

In which parts will it be shown?

People living in the eastern third of the United States will be able to see little or nothing of this event. That’s because when the visual show begins to get underway, the moon will either be approaching its setting or will have already been set. Those who live in the central and especially the far-western states will be able to see at least the first half of the eclipse, if not most of it, before the moonset. Along with a slice of the U.S. Pacific Coast, as well as the southern and western parts of Alaska and all of Hawaii, the umbral phase of the eclipse will be visible from start to finish.

In the lunar eclipse of this month, the moon will be completely in the Earth’s dark umbra will be for a short duration of 14 minutes and 31 seconds. The moon will slip through the northernmost part of the shadow.

FAQS

1. When was the last total eclipse?

It’ll be the first total eclipse of the moon since January 2019.

2. How many eclipses will occur this year?

Four eclipses will occur this year, two of the moon and two of the sun.

3. Who will be able to see it?

Those who live in the central and especially the far-western states have the advantage of seeing at least the first half of the eclipse, if not most of it, before the moonset. Along with a slice of the U.S. Pacific Coast, as well as the southern and western parts of Alaska and all of Hawaii, the umbral phase of the eclipse will be visible from start to finish.

For more details and updates visit themarketactivity.com.

 

 

 

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